More Thoughts on Mirrored Walls

I've been thinking more about putting mirror tiles or sheets on walls. Specifically, about how to make it scream 'chic!' and not 'bad 80's tract home!'

Some ideas...

Antiqued finish on the mirror:

Todd Romano


Jan Showers



Maybe some rosettes on the tiles to break it up?


Adding moulding makes the mirror look more expensive, less DIY.




JK Capri Hotel



Layering with bookshelves is one of my favorite looks:


House Beautiful

I really love the idea of hanging art on the mirror.


Elle Decor


Want another way to achieve the 'wall of mirror' look without the commitment? Add mirror to your interior doors.



Christina Murphy


Susan Jones

42 comments:

Erin @ Kelly and Horne said...

Love Mirrored walls...as long as it is done right.
They can really enlarge a space as well as give it a bit of glamour.

pve design said...

Snow White's (not so) Fairy Stepmother would certainly be the fairest of them all with one of those mirrored walls. I am loving mirrors too. Maybe it is my type A cleaning self that would just love wiping them....and then looking at them and still see smudges! :)
pve

A Perfect Gray said...

excellent piece. really love those antiqued mirrors. the rosettes are great, too!

Kim@Chattafabulous said...

I love a big mirrored wall behind a sofa - antiqued mirror is so moody!

Danika Herrick said...

Those JK Capri wingbacks are amazing!!!! (And I'm not a purple girl.)

Emily A. Clark said...

I really really like the antiqued finish option. I think it looks expensive.

Maria said...

art on the mirrors....geninus, might need to give that a try!! thanks for the inspiration jenny!!!

charmaine said...

I am loving the mirrored doors!

Melissa said...

Somebody in my town is beating me to the punch at the towering "indoor junkyard" downtown-- they have a standing requst for every piece of antiqued mirror that comes it. That's by far my favorite look. Please show if you attempt a DIY antiquing!

My Interior Life said...

All such beautiful examples of mirrored walls. I've always loved that Todd Romano room.

It seems like I've also seen a mirrored wall with lattice layered over it (if you're into more of a garden look).

You can't go wrong with any of them!

Rachel said...

I want those purple chairs!!

stefunny said...

the mirrored dining room wall in my parents house has always been one of my favorite things! However, now that I've seen these ideas theirs look a tad outdated. LOVE the rosettes and hanging art on the mirror! Great, another project to bother my mom with! I lovve it! For me personally, I'd go with the antiqued look for my place, gorgeous!!

Catherine said...

We have sliding mirror doors on our bedroom closet. They're in good shape, but have that tacky 80s brass and all the personality that goes along with it.

Any thoughts on an affordable way to bring them to 2010? Our room is small, so they add a larger feeling to it and we like that. We just want to like the doors too. :)

andi said...

Thanks for this post. It is a fine line between beautiful and tacky with mirrored walls if they're not executed properly!

Rielah said...

I love the antiqued mirrors with the rosettes.

mom23blessings said...

I love the wall of antiqued mirror! I'm wanting to do this in my dining room but not quite sure how to go about. Would love to see a tutorial and maybe I could get up enough guts to do it myself :)

J said...

I have been dreaming of an antiqued mirror backsplash in my kitchen- harlequined and set off with rosettes or "lead" moulding - I am not sure how to achieve this look, how to get the antique mirror or achieve the look without spending a fortune - I know what I want but am scared to invest without a solid plan. Any suggestions?

Amy R. said...

I do think there is a fine line between tacky and chic. I love how the mirrors reflect the light end create endless space. I am just too afraid to mirror an entire wall. I am going to stick to large floor mirrors. Best of luck. I would love to see what you come up with.

Jenny at LGN said...

Not cool, Anon 11:23 am.

carak said...

I love the mirrored doors!

Beth Wooten said...

Thanks for the idea of adding molding! It seems like it would be fairly easy to do and add some polish to the mirrors I already have!

bluehydrangea said...

Antiqued all the way..love it!

Steele Street Studios said...

I really love this post. Thanks for all of the ideas and inspiration.

Hey I found a how to on creating the antique mirror look.

http://www.ehow.com/how_4884993_do-faux-antique-mirror.html

Good Luck and have fun!

Blair

Blog Author(s) said...

I too dig mirrors in many instances. The feng shui people have BIG rules in the use of mirrors.

Personally, I think they can be tricky to use them well. Having said that, when I see them in blogs, I usually think they are a home run.

Have fun & good luck.

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Jenny at LGN said...

Anon 11:23 and 2:23,

Please stop leaving your unsolicited comments about my blog which are completely unrelated to this post. If you have a genuine concern, I'd love to have a discussion with you over email, but please stop posting your mean-spirited comments here for all to read. I think you are the one that might need some self-reflection.

j

Geo said...

Jenny,
You're a class act and I'm so glad I start my day with you.
Kimberly

Design Darling said...

i love the idea of mirrored interior doors. that space is so glamorous! have a great weekend, jenny :)

Anonymous said...

Hi Jenny - I made a huge mirror before from Home Depot 8X8 tiles - glued them with wood glue, I believe, on to a sheet of MDF, added molding and painted the whole thing oxblood red. It was big (about 52X24) for a loft-like space. I loved it until winter came and the MDF backing expanded and cracked a few of mirror panels. Just something to consider.

TheBambinaBlog said...

LOVE IT! This is on my TO-DO list for our living room. I was inspired by Robert Shapiro's home. In his case he has highly polished steel but I love the idea of smaller antiqued mirrors grouped on a grid, possibly with rosettes. I am hoping to have one on each side of the window on the front wall with matching consoles in front.Take a look at these guys:
http://antiqued-mirrors.com/

Lisa S said...

My childhood home had three sections of antique looking mirrors (5'x4'each)in the entry hallway. The surrounding walls had foil wall paper. It was very elegant looking...at least for the mid 60's. Everyone of the mirror squares survived both the Sylmar and Northridge, Calif. earthquakes...

Marcus Design said...

Wow, those doors with the squares of mirrors are stunning!! I would die to have those :)
Nancy

Lindsay Edward said...

I like the mirrors on the doors. Definitely more fun than a plain on white door. Those photos are all great examples of mirrored walls done correctly. Fun finds! :-)

Anonymous said...

I love the mirrors (and especially your blog, Jenny) too!! A local interior store sells ones with rosettes connecting sets of squares for high ($1000 upward) prices. If anyone knows of a DIY to make the rosette look, or even a cheaper source, please post it here! This is just what our living room needs to open it up.

Notes from a Broad said...

What great timing !
I live in a 100 year old French style building in Buenos Aires and I have renovated and decorated according to that ... so one wall in this house has to be mirrored.. hopefully with old antique pieces of glass ..
I have a few giant framed mirrors but I want to do the sticking it right on the wall kind too.
My ceilings are 15' high so there is a lot of wall to work with ..
I love your blog, I also love that it is filling a small gap where I am missing getting Decorating magazines in English :)
chau ~

Valuablemali said...

I've got a drop ceiling in my basement and is a large space to fill. I've added mirrors to one of the walls and it really heightens the space. Those were awesome shots though and some great ideas!

bink & boo said...

I Love mirrored walls. When I was growing up we lived in a pink trailer (in the "mobile estates"), and we had a mirrored wall in our "dining" room...I thought it was sooo fancy! Turns out I was right. LOL!

sketch42 said...

Seriously... Did a post on this, AND I have one in my house... You gotta check it out LGN, I think you will like!

Building it:
http://sketch42blog.com/2009/07/building-the-mirror-brick-wall/

And in action:
http://sketch42blog.com/2010/04/im-going-rogue/

carey said...

I love your idea and I think you should go for it! I can really see some of these on a wall in some chic NYC loft. Can't wait to see what you decide!!!

Room Design Online said...

I love using mirrored walls, especially in small spaces to create more visual space, or in an area that is going to reflect scenery. You have definitely found some great examples of mirrored walls. Here is one of my personal favorites: http://bit.ly/a7yabi.

Elizabeth said...

these are great for inspiration. The home we recently purchased - a 1940s rambler - has an enormous mirror above the fireplace and bookshelves on an entire wall in the living room.

When we first moved in I hated it and was convinced it would be the first thing to go. But after turning my mantle into a tablescape I absolutely LOVE it and how it expands the room, reflecting beautiful objects. Go figure.

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