Big Art from Small Items

An idea from Blueprint that I did love was to photograph something that's small, blow it up really big and frame it.


I love the antique letter here. The handwriting, the stamp, the ink smudge...


Other items they suggested photographing: a pretty flower from your sister's wedding, your grandmothers china, a vintage button package (reminds me of this post), an old ruler, a cool ticket stub that brings you happy memories...


Here are a couple of sources for large-format printing:

U Printing (I've heard these guys are especially good)

Large Format Posters

Mega Print

35 comments:

Helena - A Diary of Lovely said...

Oh wow, I love the cards idea!!!

Three Pink Dots said...

LGN - I just found your blog, a co-worker of mine said, have you seen Little Green Notebook? You will die, and I am! Im in Love!!! Thanks for giving such great inspirational advice. I'm a newlywed to be, redecorating a house and there are so many ideas on here....my head is getting full. Thanks!!

Concrete Jungle said...

A great idea...if I just had some wall space!

Tonia @Chic Modern Vintage said...

Great idea, but I'm trying to recall where I've seen this before, Bluprint Magazine?

pve design said...

Fun, I want to find an old love letter....and blow it up for an anniversary gift.
pve

Jade @ Flip Flops + Pearls Design said...

That's a really good idea! Thanks for sharing!

Terese said...

Great idea! I wonder how you can blow it up so big to make it not super pixelated. Awesome that the letter is addressed to someone in Somerville!

Kim@Chattafabulous said...

Jenny, I love these ideas and and appreciate you so much for being such a great source of inspiration! (and providing links, too - that's huge!)

Mary @ RoomPolish said...

oh my, these ideas are lovely! I especially love the antique letter. Gorgeous! Have a wonderful weekend!

hana said...

these are such great ideas! thanks for sharing! xo

Lisa said...

I've saved the same issue of blueprint. And actually did enlarge an old postcard I bought at a flear market. Love this idea - great post!

Aja said...

I love this idea! Thanks for the inspiration!

Project Shannon said...

What fun ideas! Thanks for sharing with us. Happy Friday!

Sarah @ Dream in Domestic said...

Awesome idea! I love it - especially the antique letter!

Mandy G. said...

Love your blog, Jenny! I read it every single day!

@ Terese: As a graphic designer for a large format printer, we run into a lot of pixelated artwork. I would suggest using a scanner to enlarge flat items like envelopes and letters. It may work on things like flowers too. A scanner gives you the option to scan the object in at 300ppi or even 1200ppi. If you're taking a 3" object and wanting to blow it up to 3' scan it in at 1200ppi and this will allow your printer to print your image without pixelation.

thesteadfastlove said...

Wow, such a great idea! Thanks for providing the sites to print, I have been trying to find a reliable place to do large prints!

<3

christine said...

I love this idea! It's so true, the backs of cards always have such amazing patterns. Thanks for the inspiration!

splendid market said...

What a great idea -- I love the thought of turning sentimental shots (wedding bouquet) into pleasing art to enjoy everyday.

Torrie said...

I am just getting back from a 2 week vacation, and a little overwhelmed with all that I need/want to do. I love the simplicity of this idea and it served as a good reminder (along with your other post that I just read- decorating with kid's artwork) that decorating does not always have to be complex or expensive. And these ideas are so much more meaningful than spending loads of money on a fancy piece of artwork, to me anyways:). Thanks for sharing!

twolovelyspaces said...

Wow, I have an old letter from my husbands grandfather that he wrote to his grandmother, to ask her out on their first date. This would be a perfect way to immortalize it. Thanks for sharing.

The Goods Design said...

Love these. Makes me miss Blueprint (even though some issues were awkward, I think they just hadn't figured out their rhythm yet.) I need more exciting shelter mags again!

Mackenzie {Design Darling} said...

Love, love, LOVE this concept! Oh, the possibilities... Enjoy your weekend!

Aimee@ the Functional Space said...

This was one of my favorite ideas from Blueprint. I still have the article saved in my artwork inspiration file. I seem to remember a great portrait of a dachshund blown up and hanging over a sofa. Loved that. That letter is pretty awesome too. Thanks Jenny for the great reminder!

kalanicut said...

I still remember the day I saw that big envelope photo on the wall in a magazine at the hair salon a few yrs. ago. I melted. Did that again today. Such a great idea.

Deb and Mark said...

I did this with the envelope of a love letter written in 1909 by great grandfather to my great grandmother. Not only is it beautiful art (the calligraphy is awesome), it is such a sentimental piece and always sparks comments by new visitors to my home. I had it done at FedEx, formerly Kinkos, and they were very helpful in advising me on how large I could go without degrading the quality of the image.

Erika at BluLabel Bungalow said...

I LOVE THIS! Thanks for posting these ideas!

Henna @ AboutDivorce Blog said...

you decorate things really well, the idea of a envelope hanging in your living room is too cool, very stylish and very fashionable,

the sassy kathy said...

yes!!!!!!! i definitely have these pages from Blueprint ripped out. I think this was my favorite issue. Loved this idea! Thanks for re-inspiring me by posting it!

Eddie said...

This is a really great idea. I can't wait to try it out.

@Terese: You just take a photo with a camera that has very high dpi or use a very good scanner.

Living Livelier said...

totally inspired by this - the blow up of that envelope is simply stunning. As a former h.s.
history teacher and generally sappy/sentimental gal, I am going for this in a major way. Can't wait to experiment!

hangeng said...

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court. said...

Jenny,

I used Large Format Printers per your suggestion to do this:

http://bigbeigebox.blogspot.com/2010/08/img00089-20100811-1620jpg.html

VERY happy with the results.

Bella *Bellgetsreal said...

I adore this idea. Love the postcard. I think I should blow up my passport stamps. So fun.

Sabrina said...

I STILL have this issue because I loved the idea of blowing something up and having a big print of it!
I have the perfect postcard that I am going to use someday.

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